PIF Tower

Riyadh

Note: As this project is architecturally topped out, the data is based on the most reliable information currently available. This data is thus subject to change until the building has completed and all information can be confirmed and ratified by the CTBUH.

Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

385 m / 1,263 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

385 m / 1,263 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

352.5 m / 1,156 ft
1 2 3 PIF Tower Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 385.0 m / 1,263 ft
Floors 72
Official Name
The current legal building name.

PIF Tower

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Capital Market Authority Tower, CMA Tower, Capital Market Authority Headquarters

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

King Abdullah Financial District

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Architecturally Topped Out

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Saudi Arabia

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Riyadh

Postal Code

13511

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Filled Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Energy Label

LEED Gold

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

385.0 m / 1,263 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
385.0 m / 1,263 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
352.5 m / 1,156 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

72

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

40

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

7 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

213,300 m² / 2,295,942 ft²

Construction Schedule
2009

Proposed

2010

Construction Start

2021

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Concept
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Façade Maintenance
Security
WSP
Vertical Transportation
Way Finding
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Elevator
Formwork
Owner/Developer
Al Ra'idah Investment Company
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Concept
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Peer Review

The Peer Review Engineer traditionally comments on the information produced by another party, and to render second opinions, but not to initiate what the design looks like from the start.

BuroHappold
MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Peer Review

The Peer Review Engineer traditionally comments on the information produced by another party, and to render second opinions, but not to initiate what the design looks like from the start.

BuroHappold
Project Manager

The CTBUH lists a project manager when a specific firm has been commissioned to oversee this aspect of a tall building’s design/construction. When the project management efforts are handled by the developer, main contract, or architect, this field will be omitted.

Sweett Group
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Saudi Bin Laden Group
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Façade Maintenance
Food Service
Worrell Design Group
Geotechnical
RGF
Parking
Walker Parking Consultants
Security
WSP
Vertical Transportation
Way Finding
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Jangho Group Co., Ltd.
Elevator
TK Elevator GmbH; Sematic S.r.l.
Fire Proofing
Grace Construction Products
Formwork

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Façade Engineering Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall

28 November 2018 - CTBUH Research

Top Company Rankings: The World’s 100 Tallest Buildings

13 October 2016 - CTBUH Research

Videos

20 August 2015 | Riyadh

The Design of the Capital Market Authority Tower, Riyadh

HOK's Roger Soto discusses the design of the Capital Market Authority Tower in Riyadh.

Research

30 January 2020

Tall Building Predictions for 2020

CTBUH Research

The combined brains of the CTBUH editorial and database staff boldly predict what might happen across the global skyscraper industry in 2020. Check out our...

About PIF Tower

The PIF Tower is designed as the centerpiece of this new office district, and symbolizes the beginning of a new era of financial development within Riyadh.

A primary requirement for the building’s design was that it be both efficient and iconic. Architects were constrained by an oddly-shaped building site, with many surfaces around it that needed to be accommodated. This informed the prismatic shape of the building, with its many diamond-shaped facets that allow the sun to be captured in a variety of ways. The base of the hexagonal building is on a podium structure, which integrates public and private spaces, including dining facilities and a two-story auditorium.

The architects carefully considered the hot, sunny climate of Riyadh when designing this building, which is expected to achieve LEED Gold certification. The tower’s transparency creates internal openness and provides access to natural light within the workplace. A high-performance solar control system moderates the intense Saudi light and heat. An external layer of fins, gantries, and perforated panels provides shade, amplifying the thermal efficiency of the triple-pane unitized glazing. Together, these shading devices minimize solar gain and internal cooling loads, reducing HVAC requirements. Electrical energy is reclaimed through a photovoltaic array installation on the tower’s roof.

Eliminating copper-wire-based distribution systems for data and security further reduces internal heat gain. The design uses the “cool” technologies of wireless communication, air-blown fiber optics, and converged networks. The intelligent infrastructure merges voice, data, and video networks to reduce costs, centralize management, and boost productivity. Since each of these systems has been fitted with redundant capacity, the building is well-prepared for further expansion and a high-tech future.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Façade Engineering Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

20 August 2015 | Riyadh

The Design of the Capital Market Authority Tower, Riyadh

HOK's Roger Soto discusses the design of the Capital Market Authority Tower in Riyadh.

19 September 2012 | Riyadh

The Next Generation of Ultra High-Rise Buildings

In recent times, several invitations have been issued by Governmental and Private Bodies to develop the next tallest building in the world, often with target...

30 January 2020

Tall Building Predictions for 2020

CTBUH Research

The combined brains of the CTBUH editorial and database staff boldly predict what might happen across the global skyscraper industry in 2020. Check out our...

20 October 2018

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall

CTBUH Research

The Middle East region is hosting its first CTBUH International Conference since 2008. In that year, there were 119 completed buildings of 150 meters or...

01 December 2016

An Overview of Structural & Aesthetic Developments in Tall Buildings Using Exterior Bracing & Diagrid Systems

Kheir Al-Kodmany, University of Illinois; Mir M. Ali, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

There is much architectural and engineering literature which discusses the virtues of exterior bracing and diagrid systems in regards to sustainability - two systems which...

26 October 2015

Iconic Office Tower Propels Saudi Arabia into the New Global Century: Challenges and Innovations

Roger Soto, HOK; Basem Al-Shihabi, Omrania & Associates

As the centerpiece of the King Abdullah Financial District, the Capital Market Authority (CMA) Tower is evidence of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s economic diversification...

31 December 2014

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2014

Daniel Safarik, Antony Wood, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in...

14 November 2013

The Middle East: 20 Years of Building Skyscrapers

CTBUH Research

Twenty years ago, the Middle East contained only one skyscraper over 150 meters in height. It is now estimated that by the end of 2015...

01 April 2013

Fast-growing Saudi Arabia Embraces Tall Buildings

John Harris, Jones Lang LaSalle

Amid a rapidly changing cultural and economic landscape in Saudi Arabia, John Harris, co-head of Jones Lang LaSalle’s Saudi Arabia office, discusses the shifts in...

28 November 2018

The Middle East: 30+ Years of Building Tall

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study examining the relationship between high-rise growth and population in the Middle East.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

31 December 2014

An All-Time Record 97 Buildings of 200 Meters or Higher Completed in 2014 and 2014 showed further shifts towards Asia, and also surprising developments in building functions and structural materials.