88
Global
Height rank

Tianjin World Financial Center

Tianjin
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

336.9 m / 1,105 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

336.9 m / 1,105 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

313.6 m / 1,029 ft
1 2 3 Tianjin World Financial Center Outline
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

75
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 336.9 m / 1,105 ft
Floors 75
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Tianjin World Financial Center

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Tianjin Jinta Tower, Global Financial Center

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2011

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

China

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Tianjin

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Steel
Columns
Concrete Filled Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

336.9 m / 1,105 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
336.9 m / 1,105 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
313.6 m / 1,029 ft
Observatory
313.6 m / 1,029 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

75

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

925

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

41

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

203,953 m² / 2,195,332 ft²

Rankings
#
88
Tallest in the World
#
54
Tallest in Asia
#
46
Tallest in China
#
3
Tallest in Tianjin
#
32
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
20
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
17
Tallest Office Building in China
#
2
Tallest Office Building in Tianjin
#
53
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
47
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
42
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
3
Tallest Composite Building in Tianjin
Construction Schedule
2006

Proposed

2007

Construction Start

2011

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Quantity Surveyor
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Owner/Developer
Finance Street Tianjin Real Estate Co., Ltd.
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Quantity Surveyor
Wind
BMT Fluid Mechanics Ltd.
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Jangho Group Co., Ltd.

CTBUH Initiatives

Top Company Rankings: The World’s 100 Tallest Buildings

13 October 2016 - CTBUH Research

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

31 December 2011 - CTBUH Journal

Videos

19 September 2012 | Tianjin

Considering Place in an Integrated Approach to Tall

The rapid development of Chinese cities has provided unique opportunities to create architecture that either responds to its context or, in the case of emerging...

Research

17 October 2016

SOM and China: Evolving Skyscraper Design Amid Rapid Urban Growth

Scott Duncan & Yue Zhu, SOM

China’s rapid urban and economic growth has challenged designers, engineers, and planners to innovate and collaborate to meet the needs of a changing country. Skidmore,...

About Tianjin World Financial Center

The Tianjin World Financial Center in Tianjin is the iconic marker of the new Central Business District at the periphery of the historic city center. Sited in the prominent Haihe River, the building plan incorporates a riverwalk promenade, emphasizing the importance of the natural resource. Visible from all of Tianjin, the tower serves as the beginning of not only the master plan for the area, but for the modernization of the local economy and city in general.

The form of the tower was parametrically driven through the creation of a pleated paper-like façade, referencing ancient Chinese paper arts. The slightly curving folds of the tower create generous bays in the floor plates, providing a unique interior experience for the offices. In order to support this unique geometry, an innovative structural system had to be devised using steel plate shear walls, utilizing the local knowledge and labor of steel shipbuilding techniques. Hollow steel tubes were designed and filled with high-strength concrete to allow the minimum diameter columns, maintaining open spaces on the interior.

In a departure from the atypical high-rise floor plan, the tower features a slender framework that results in a height-to-width ratio of 1:8. The façade of the building is composed of a perforate series of fabricated steel panels and windows that visually obscure the tower’s otherwise curvilinear form. Like many towers that utilize a tapering profile, each floor houses a slightly different program, providing a diverse selection of office space for prospective tenants.

In a city known for its intense seasonal winds, the narrow form of the building called for careful engineering considerations. After investigating various structural solutions, the design team selected steel plate sheer walls (SPSW) as the most efficient and appropriate lateral load resisting system. As opposed to conventional sheer walls, this system is composed of large steel plate walls that are welded together and positioned between columns to counteract lateral loads, effectively transferring earthquake and wind forces down to the foundation. This system was preferred not only for its structural soundness, but for the availability of materials, as Tianjin boasts the third largest reserves of iron ore in China. Ultimately, this innovative structural system resulted in a material reduction of 20 to 25 percent over traditional steel systems.

Quick Facts

  • The building has a height to width ration of 1:8.

17 October 2016

SOM and China: Evolving Skyscraper Design Amid Rapid Urban Growth

Scott Duncan & Yue Zhu, SOM

China’s rapid urban and economic growth has challenged designers, engineers, and planners to innovate and collaborate to meet the needs of a changing country. Skidmore,...

01 August 2016

Engineering China’s Skylines

Dasui Wang, East China Architectural Design Institute

Dasui Wang, China Design Master and chief structural engineer for East China Architectural Design Institute (ECADI), is the recipient of the inaugural CITAB - CTBUH...

19 September 2012

New Construction Technologies in Tianjin Jinta Mansion

Yaohui Yang, Junfeng gao & Jing Wang, China Construction First Division Group Construction & Development Co., Ltd.

The 73-story and 336.9 meter Tianjin Jinta Mansion is the tallest building in the world designed to apply concrete filled steel tube columns and pure...

31 December 2011

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

Nathaniel Hollister & Antony Wood, CTBUH

The annual story is becoming a familiar one: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011 have each sequentially broke the record for the most 200...

01 February 2011

World’s Tallest Steel Shear Walled Building

Mark Sarkisian & Neville Mathias, SOM; Dasui Wang, ECADI; Sam Lee, Guangzhou Scientific Computing Consultants

Because of its iconic slender form, a key design challenge was to develop an efficient lateral system capable of resisting wind and seismic lateral load;...

01 May 2010

Performance Based Seismic Design of a 75-Story Buckling Restrained Slender Steel Plate Shear Wall Tower

Sam Lee & Yun Liao, Guangzhou Scientific Computing Consultants; Dasui Wang, ECADI; Neville Mathias, SOM

The Jinta Tower is a 75-story building located in Tianjin, China, with slender steel plate shear walls (SPSW) used as the primary lateral load resisting...

01 July 2008

Steel Plate Shear Walls, Efficient Structural Solution for Slender High-rise in China

Mark Sarkisian, Neville Mathias, Eric Long & Zhihui Huang, SOM

The 329.6 meter tall 74-story Jinta Tower in Tianjin, China, is expected, when complete, to be the tallest building in the world with slender steel...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

31 December 2011

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2011

The annual story is becoming a familiar one: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011 have each sequentially broke the record for the most 200 meter or higher buildings completed in a given year. Once again, more 200 m+ buildings were completed in 2011 than in any year previous.