7
Global
Height rank
Tianjin CTF Finance Centre
Tianjin
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

530.4 m / 1,740 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

530 m / 1,739 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

439.4 m / 1,441 ft
1 2 3 Tianjin CTF Finance Centre Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

97
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
Height 530 m / 1,739 ft
Floors 97
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Tianjin CTF Finance Centre
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Tianjin Chow Tai Fook Binhai Center
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2019
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
300457
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

hotel / serviced apartments / office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
LEED Gold
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
530 m / 1,739 ft
To Tip
530.35 m / 1,740 ft
Occupied
439.35 m / 1,441 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

97
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
# of Apartments

Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

249
# of Hotel Rooms

Number of Hotel Rooms refers to the total number of hotel rooms contained within a particular building.

365
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

1761
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

80
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

291,000 m² / 3,132,298 ft²
Rankings
#
7
Tallest in the World
#
4
Tallest in Asia
#
3
Tallest in China
#
1
Tallest in Tianjin
#
5
Tallest Mixed-use Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Asia
#
2
Tallest Mixed-use Building in China
#
1
Tallest Mixed-use Building in Tianjin
#
5
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
4
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
3
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Tianjin
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2013

Construction Start

2019

Completed

Owner/Developer
Chow Tai Fook Enterprises
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Contractor
China Construction Eighth Engineering Division

Acoustics

Campbell Shillinglaw Lau Ltd

BIM

Syntegrate

Façade Maintenance

Interiors

Dreamtime Australia Design; Laguarda.Low Architects; Lim + Lu; AB Concept Limited; Make

Landscape

PLandscape Co., Ltd.; AECOM

Lighting

Brandston Partnership, Inc.; Isometrix Lighting + Design, Ltd.

Security

WSP

Traffic

Vertical Transportation

WSP

Wind

BMT Fluid Mechanics Ltd.

Ceiling

Armstrong Ceiling Solutions

Cladding

Dow

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Paint/Coating

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building 400 meters and above 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

Construction Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

Structural Engineering Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2019


12 December 2019 - CTBUH Research

Videos

17 October 2016 | Tianjin

New World Development Company Limited (NWD) has been a listed property developer in Hong Kong for nearly half a century. With businesses encompassing property development,...

Research

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The tall buildings completed in 2020 have pushed the global average height of the 100 tallest buildings to 399 meters. Across the year, 14 buildings...

About Tianjin CTF Finance Centre

The Tianjin CTF Finance Centre is located in the Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, an outer district of Tianjin, China. The tower serves as an anchor for the larger area development, while housing office space, luxury serviced apartments, and a hotel.

By stacking reducing floor plates, the tower tapers dramatically to minimize the surface area exposed to wind, sun, and moisture. The gently-undulating curves of the façade subtly denote the integration of the three distinct programs within a singular smooth object. Square in plan with rounded corners, the floor plate geometry enables unique interior fit-outs and customization options for occupants. Research by the architect has the shown that lateral forces due to vortex shedding can be controlled by tapering the vertical profile of the tower and softening any sharp corners in plan. The building’s aerodynamic shape greatly reduces this vortex shedding by “confusing the wind” and disrupting the opportunity for any resonating wind forces and loads on the structure.

The softly curving glass skin integrates eight sloping megacolumns that follow a lyrical line connecting the centers and corners of all four elevations. These curving megacolumns increase the structure’s response to seismic concerns and are integral to both the gravity and lateral systems. They are effective in increasing the stiffness of the building’s perimeter frame, consequently attracting a larger portion of the seismic forces in compliance with the Chinese code requirements.

The façade reinforces the curvature of the tower form and creates a shimmering texture over the building’s surface. The crystalline-like curtain wall stretches from the suspended glass canopies at each of the lobbies to the dematerialized, megacolumn-looped crown and presents a bold expression of a comprehensive, integrated design on the Tianjin skyline.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building 400 meters and above 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

Construction Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

Structural Engineering Award 2021 Award of Excellence

2021 CTBUH Awards

17 October 2016 | Tianjin

New World Development Company Limited (NWD) has been a listed property developer in Hong Kong for nearly half a century. With businesses encompassing property development,...

17 September 2014 | Tianjin

This presentation presents the thinking behind the design of the two supertall towers of Chow Tai Fook Enterprise– the Guangzhou CTF Finance Center and the...

19 September 2012 | Tianjin

The rapid development of Chinese cities has provided unique opportunities to create architecture that either responds to its context or, in the case of emerging...

12 January 2021

CTBUH Research

The tall buildings completed in 2020 have pushed the global average height of the 100 tallest buildings to 399 meters. Across the year, 14 buildings...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

Providing a global overview of tall building development, design and construction, the CTBUH Awards Program and related Tall + Urban Innovation Conference annually survey projects,...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

In the first edition of the 2012 Journal, CTBUH published a Tall Buildings in Numbers study titled Tallest 20 in 2020: Era of the Megatall—The...

20 March 2020

CTBUH Research

This research paper undertakes a review of the 2012 report by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, “Tallest 20 in 2020: Entering the...

30 January 2020

Brian Lee, Thomas Kinzl, Inho Rhee & Ronald Johnson, SOM

Completed in 2019, the Tianjin Chow Tai Fook (CTF) Finance Centre is currently the seventh-tallest building in the world, tied with the Guangzhou CTF Finance...

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

In 2019, 126 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed. This was a 13.7 percent decrease from 146 in 2018. The total number...

12 December 2019

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2019

The year 2019 was remarkable for the tall building industry, with 26 supertall buildings (300 meters or taller) completed, the most in any year. This is the second consecutive year in which this record was broken, besting 18 supertalls in 2018.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

8 December 2011

The Tallest 20 in 2020: Entering the Era of the Megatall

Within this decade we will likely witness not only the world’s first kilometer-tall building, but also the completion of a significant number of buildings over 600 meters.