17
Global
Height rank
Petronas Twin Tower 2
Kuala Lumpur
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

451.9 m / 1,483 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

451.9 m / 1,483 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

375 m / 1,230 ft
1 2 3 Petronas Twin Tower 2 Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

88
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
Height 451.9 m / 1,483 ft
Floors 88
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Petronas Twin Tower 2
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Tower 2, Petronas Twin Tower Kuala Lumpur City Centre, Petronas Tower 2
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 1998
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Address
Postal Code
50088
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Reinforced Concrete
Floor Spanning
Steel
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
451.9 m / 1,483 ft
To Tip
451.9 m / 1,483 ft
Occupied
375 m / 1,230 ft
Observatory
370 m / 1,214 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

88
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

5
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

39
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

197,500 m² / 2,125,872 ft²
Rankings
#
17
Tallest in the World
#
12
Tallest in Asia
#
1
Tallest in Malaysia
#
1
Tallest in Kuala Lumpur
#
6
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
4
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Malaysia
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Kuala Lumpur
#
14
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
12
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Malaysia
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Kuala Lumpur
Construction Schedule
1992

Construction Start

1998

Completed

Architect
Structural Engineer
Ranhill Bersekutu Bhd
MEP Engineer
KTA Tenaga Sdn Bhd
Contractor
Kukdong Engineering & Construction; Samsung C&T Corporation; Syarikat Jasatera Sdn. Bhd.

Damping

Vidaris, Inc.

Façade Maintenance

Wind

Construction Hoists

Façade Maintenance Equipment

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

Paint/Coating

Steel

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

Videos

30 October 2017 | Kuala Lumpur

Recent developments in the design and construction of progressively taller buildings using engineered timber as a structural material raise important questions about the language that...

Research

30 July 2018

CTBUH Research

As tall buildings continue to be built in seismically-active and cyclone-prone areas, the need to augment the structures of these buildings with dynamic modification devices...

About Petronas Twin Tower 2

The Petronas Towers, located in Kuala Lumpur, were designed to herald the emergence of Malaysia into the global economy and act as an easily identifiable symbol for the fast-growing country.

The development’s scope, scale, and design reflect the desire to create a representative manifestation of local traditions and ingenuity. In particular, the design is based on Islamic geometry, a reflection of Malaysia’s cultural heritage. The buildings are perhaps most noteworthy for the skybridge that connects them on the 41st and 42nd floors. Although there is no structural benefit to the connection, it offers more than just an architectural flourish. By linking the two buildings together, the facilities of each tower around that level can be shared, including a conference room, prayer room, and executive dining room. Additionally, the skybridge is an integral part of the towers’ fire evacuation strategy.

Due to budgetary constraints, the development timeline of Petronas Towers was constrained to six years, an ambitious feat considering that the original expected construction time for the project was eight years. To speed things along, two construction consortiums were hired, each being responsible for building one of the towers. Naturally, incentives were established that rewarded the first team to the top with the rights to build the skybridge, resulting in a race between the Japanese and South Korean consortiums. Ultimately, Tower 2 was the first to reach its pinnacle, with the South Korean crew claiming victory.

Quick Facts

  • Tallest twin-tower buildings in the world.

  • Shared world's tallest building title with Petronas Tower 1; 1998 - 2004.

30 October 2017 | Kuala Lumpur

Recent developments in the design and construction of progressively taller buildings using engineered timber as a structural material raise important questions about the language that...

16 March 2017 | Kuala Lumpur

Thursday, March 16, 2017. Chicago, United States of America. Hosted in collaboration with the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the first lecture of the series Building Tall...

18 October 2016 | Kuala Lumpur

Tuesday, October 18, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Ron Klemencic, Magnusson Klemencic Associates; Karl Almstead, Turner Construction Company; Andrew Nicholson, CBRE; Jon Pickard, Pickard Chilton; Ian Smith,...

18 October 2016 | Kuala Lumpur

Hashimah Hashim of KLCC Property Holdings Berhad is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Hashimah discusses the master planning and development...

18 October 2016 | Kuala Lumpur

Jon Pickard of Pickard Chilton is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2016 CTBUH China Conference. Jon discusses the local economic impacts of tall buildings.

17 October 2016 | Kuala Lumpur

Monday October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Dennis Poon of Thornton Tomasetti, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 4c: Structural & Geotechnic Engineering. As the...

30 July 2018

CTBUH Research

As tall buildings continue to be built in seismically-active and cyclone-prone areas, the need to augment the structures of these buildings with dynamic modification devices...

01 August 2011

Antony Wood, CTBUH

The terrorist attacks and consequential collapse of the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001 resulted in, arguably, the largest single retrospective analysis of...

01 February 2010

Ali Sherif S. Rizk, Dar Al-Handasah Consultants

During the last 12 years the Structural Engineering Department at Dar Al-Handasah has designed 45 mixed-use tall buildings in different Arab countries. The designed towers...

10 October 2004

Jae-Ho Kim & Seung-Hoon Lee, Samsung Corporation

This paper will focus on the development of high performance concrete for the highest building in the world, which required careful planning and choice of...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

16 December 2009

Height: The History of Measuring Tall Buildings

This article describes some of the events which took place in the Council's long, and sometimes complex, history of measuring tall buildings.

29 April 2007

CTBUH / Nakheel Asia Tour Report

CTBUH collaborated with the Dubai-based developer Nakheel and architects Woods Bagot to facilitate a 5-nation tour of seminal tall buildings in south-east Asia.