One Central Park

Sydney
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

117 m / 384 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

117 m / 384 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

110.6 m / 363 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

34
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
1 2 3 One Central Park Outline
Height 117.0 m / 384 ft
Floors 34
Official Name
The current legal building name.

One Central Park

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

One Central Park East Tower

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Central Park

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed, 2014

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Australia

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Sydney

Postal Code

2000

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

residential

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete/steel

Energy Label

5 Star Green Star

Official Website

One Central Park

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

117.0 m / 384 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
117.0 m / 384 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
110.6 m / 363 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

34

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Apartments
Number of Apartments refers to the total number of residential units (including both rental units and condominiums) contained within a particular building.

623

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

625

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

14

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

3.5 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

32,000 m² / 344,445 ft²

Construction Schedule
2008

Proposed

2010

Construction Start

2014

Completed

Owner/Developer
Architect
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Landscape
Lighting
BOA
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Construction Hoists
Owner/Developer
Frasers Property Limited; Sekisui House Australia
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Ateliers Jean Nouvel; Urbis Pty Ltd
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Watpac Construction
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Access
Patrick Blanc; Device Logic; Kennovations
Environmental
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Landscape
Patrick Blanc; Jean-Claude HARDY; Turf Design Studio; Aspect Studios; Oculus
Lighting
BOA; AIK-Atelier de Yann Kersale
Preservation
GML Heritage Pty Ltd
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Construction Hoists

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Innovation Award 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Executive Director Presents at Chapter Events in Australia

7 March 2017 - Event

10_15 CTBUH Leader's Message

27 October 2015 - Leaders Message

Videos

31 October 2017 | Sydney

Interview: Elizabeth Farrelly

Elizabeth Farrelly, of the Sydney Morning Herald and Australian School of Urbanism, is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference

Research

11 October 2019

Tall Buildings in Numbers: 50 Years of Tall Building Evolution

CTBUH Research

The default image of the skyscraper for the past 50 years in the public imagination has likely been the extruded, rectilinear corporate “box,” derived from...

About One Central Park

One Central Park (OCP) is an innovative and environmentally ambitious landmark project within the redevelopment of the Carlton & United Brewery site near Central Station in Sydney. The overall planning intent is to adhere to the highest standards of sustainable residential design under the Australian Green Star rating system and support the vision of an environmentally responsible future for the city.

In order to make the two towers of OCP visibly greener than is normally perceivable in Green Star developments, the design takes a broader approach to carbon-conscious design. With the help of two unusual technologies - hydroponics and heliostats - plants are grown all around the building to provide organic shading, and direct sunlight is harvested all year long for heating and lighting. The shading saves cooling energy, while the redirected sunlight is an all-year light source for the building precinct and adjoining park. Beyond the bravado of their technical deployment and performance, the plants and reflected daylight are also just natural resources, made available in an unusual way for the enjoyment of Sydney's residents.

Of particular note is the inclusion of a park at the tower’s base. The first design challenge was to give the new park a real presence at an urban scale. Because OCP is a high-rise, it is possible to bring the park up into the sky along its facades and make it visible in the city at a distance. On the south side, the park rises in a sequence of planted plateaus scattered like puzzle pieces in randomized patterns across the facades, so that each apartment has not only a balcony, but also its own piece of the park. At the individual scale, this creates pleasant private gardens. At a collective scale, it’s a green urban sculpture.

On the north, east and west sides, the green takes more continuous veil-like appearances with green walls, continuous planter bands and climbing vegetation. The plants deliver a message of sustainability, and because their shade reduces energy consumption for cooling and their leaves trap carbon dioxide, they also effectively make the building more sustainable. In total, more than 5 kilometers of planters function like permanent shading shelves and reduce thermal impact in the apartments by up to 30 percent. The plants also trap Carbon Dioxide, emit Oxygen and reflect less heat back into the city than traditional fixed shading. The plants are irrigated with recycled grey and black water, and their growth can be custom-tailored to the needs of each façade area.

A design challenge arises from the tall massing along the north side of the site. In order to remediate overshadowing of the park, the volume is broken up into a lower and a taller tower. On the roof of the lower tower, 42 heliostats (sunlight tracking mirrors) redirect sunlight up to 320 reflectors on a cantilever off the taller tower, which then beam the light down into areas that would otherwise be in permanent shade. The system adapts hourly and seasonally to the need for brightness and warmth, redirecting heat to absorbent pool of water atop the atrium glass in summer, which can be drained to assist with heating in the winter. The system redirects up to 200 square meters of direct sunlight and utilizes approximately 40 percent of the corresponding power during Sydney’s 26,00 annual sunshine hours. The performance of this system is not accounted for in the BASIX (Building Sustainability Index of New South Wales) and Green Star calculations.

Dappled lights move on the ground in a precisely programmed choreography. At night, the heliostat becomes a monumental urban chandelier and appears in the dark sky like a floating pool of tiny LED lights that merge into a giant screen and simulate reflections of glittering harbor waters.

One Central Park assists Sydney in its goal of moving towards improving its carbon footprint. The project provides much-needed apartments in the city’s main job market at its urban core. It reduces energy consumption by 25 percent when compared to a conventional building of its size. Thermal impact of sunlight on the building is reduced by up to 30 percent because of the presence of greenery, which of course traps carbon dioxide and emits oxygen as well.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Worldwide 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Innovation Award 2014 Award of Excellence

2014 CTBUH Awards

31 October 2017 | Sydney

Interview: Elizabeth Farrelly

Elizabeth Farrelly, of the Sydney Morning Herald and Australian School of Urbanism, is interviewed by Chris Bentley during the 2017 CTBUH Australia Conference

12 March 2015 | Sydney

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Mark Giles, PTW Architects

Mark Giles, Senior Associate, PTW Architects presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the completion of One Central Park, Sydney.

12 March 2015 | Sydney

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Mark Giles, PTW Architects

After an introduction from John Flynn, the Australia Chairman, Mark Giles, a Senior Associate at PTW Architects presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration...

12 March 2015 | Sydney

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Matt Harding, Robert Bird Group

Matt Harding, Principal, Robert Bird Group presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the structure of One Central Park, Sydney.

12 March 2015 | Sydney

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Question and Answer

The Question and Answer session of the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on One Central Park, Sydney featured speakers: Mark Giles, Senior Associate, PTW...

12 March 2015 | Sydney

Urban Regeneration Seminar – One Central Park: Robert Saidman, Arup

Robert Saidman, Principal, Arup presents at the first CTBUH Australia Urban Regeneration Seminar on the services of One Central Park, Sydney.

06 November 2014 | Sydney

2014 Awards - Session 3 Q&A

Thursday, 6th November 2014 Chicago, USA. Leslie Shepherd, Chief Architect, General Services Administration, James Cutler, Founding Partner, Cutler Anderson Architects, Michael Goldrick, Project Management Director,...

06 November 2014 | Sydney

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia: Tall, Green, and Generous: One Central Park

One Central Park (OCP) is an innovative and environmentally ambitious landmark project within the redevelopment of the Carlton & United Brewery site near Central Station...

06 November 2014 | Sydney

CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Dinner

The 13th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

06 November 2014 | Sydney

Interview: One Central Park

Thursday 6th November 2014. Chicago, IL. Michael Goldrick, Frasers Property, and Bertram Beissel, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, are interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding the Best Tall...

11 October 2019

Tall Buildings in Numbers: 50 Years of Tall Building Evolution

CTBUH Research

The default image of the skyscraper for the past 50 years in the public imagination has likely been the extruded, rectilinear corporate “box,” derived from...

06 November 2014

Case Study: One Central Park, Sydney

Jean Nouvel & Bertram Beissel, Ateliers Jean Nouvel

One Central Park was developed as a response to growing demand for residential accommodation in downtown Sydney. Its developers and designers used the opportunity to...

9 March 2017

CTBUH Executive Director Presents at Chapter Events in Australia

Executive Director Antony Wood delivered two well attended lectures in Sydney and Melbourne, organized by the respective local CTBUH committees.

27 October 2015

10_15 CTBUH Leader's Message

CTBUH Board of Trustees, Secretary Craig Gibbons give a CTBUH Leader's Message on 2015 International Conference in New York City.

27 August 2015

Skin NY

CTBUH New York, in association with the New York Young Professionals Committee hosted an event entitled Skin:NY that focused on high-rise façade design and construction

22 May 2015

Inaugural Japan Symposium Rises to the Occasion in Tokyo

CTBUH held its inaugural Japan Symposium at the Academy Hills lecture hall of the Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills, bringing together leading experts

12 March 2015

CTBUH Australia Hosts Urban Regeneration Seminar

More than 100 people attended the presentation on One Central Park, the first of CTBUH Australia's Urban Regeneration Breakfast Seminars.