61
Global
Height rank
Emirates Tower One
Dubai
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

354.6 m / 1,163 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

354.6 m / 1,163 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

241.4 m / 792 ft
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

54
1 2 3 Emirates Tower One Outline
Height 354.6 m / 1,163 ft
Floors 54
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Emirates Tower One
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Emirates Office Tower
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2000
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
354.6 m / 1,163 ft
To Tip
354.6 m / 1,163 ft
Occupied
241.38 m / 792 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

54
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

17
Rankings
#
61
Tallest in the World
#
14
Tallest in Middle East
#
12
Tallest in United Arab Emirates
#
11
Tallest in Dubai
#
23
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Office Building in Middle East
#
2
Tallest Office Building in United Arab Emirates
#
2
Tallest Office Building in Dubai
#
38
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Middle East
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in United Arab Emirates
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Dubai
Owner
Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum
Architect
NORR Limited; Hazel W.S. Wong
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Donald Smith, Seymour & Rooley
Contractor

Geotechnical

Coffey Geotechnics Pty Ltd; Hyder Consulting

Aluminium

Construction Hoists

Elevator

Mitsubishi Elevator and Escalator

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

Steel

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

Videos

03 March 2008 | Dubai

Andy Davids from Hyder Consulting gave an overview of the design and construction of some of the tallest buildings in the world, currently under construction...

Research

08 August 2017

Leading Women in Tall Buildings

Recently, there has been a growing and overdue recognition in the architecture discipline that women are under-represented, not just in terms of leadership positions held,...

About Emirates Tower One

The Emirates Towers are one of the most distinctive skyscraper duos in the world, and were some of the first skyscrapers to be located along Sheikh Zayed Road in the financial center of Dubai, signaling a trend that has since seen the thoroughfare boom with construction activity. On the periphery of the complex, a beautifully landscaped environment with lush vegetation and meandering pathways imparts the feeling of an oasis in an otherwise rigid urban hardscape.

The towers rise from a three-story terraced podium, which houses a boutique retail mall, restaurants, and cafés. At the base, intersecting planes of curvilinear and vertical elements frame grand staircases that lead to the podium levels. Clad in silver aluminum panels, and both silver and copper reflective glass, the slim towers capture shifting sunlight throughout the day, and enhance the bright city lights at nightfall. On either side of the towers are rounded low-rise parking structures, reminiscent of the shifting sand dunes that surround the city.

Both towers feature equilateral cross sections, with triangular footprint that affords the structure more stability from the lateral forces of wind and earthquakes. In Emirate Tower One, steel transfers at level nine distribute loads from concrete-filled steel tubular columns into three triangular legs at the perimeter. Three additional transfer floors and a tuned mass damper at the peak provide for maximum stability. A steel and concrete hybrid solution throughout the tower allows for an abundance of column-free office space.

Quick Facts

  • The Jumeirah Emirates Towers were designed by architect Hazel Wong, while at NORR Limited, and are often cited as the tallest skyscrapers to be designed by a woman at the time of completion.

03 March 2008 | Dubai

Andy Davids from Hyder Consulting gave an overview of the design and construction of some of the tallest buildings in the world, currently under construction...

08 August 2017

Leading Women in Tall Buildings

Recently, there has been a growing and overdue recognition in the architecture discipline that women are under-represented, not just in terms of leadership positions held,...

01 December 2015

Harry Poulos, Coffey Geotechnics; Frances Badelow, Mott MacDonald

This paper discusses the design parameters that are required for the design of high-rise building foundations, and suggests that the method of assessment for these...

03 March 2008

Andy Davids, Jonathan Wongso, Darko Popovic & Angus McFarlane, Hyder Consulting Middle East

This paper presents an overview of the design and construction of some of the tallest buildings in the world, currently under construction in the Gulf...

10 October 2004

Khaled A. Al-Sallal, UAE University

The active construction of tall buildings in the UAE, as a result of the rapid growth of economy, goes in a fast pace and has...

26 February 2001

Hazel W. S. Wong, NORR Group

Proposed winning competition design by Hazel W. S. Wong (Fig. 1) realized the objective of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

4 March 2008

Technical Tours, CTBUH 8th World Congress

Tours to experience five seminal projects in Dubai including the Burj Dubai, the Emirates Towers, the Index Tower, the Burj Al Arab and Palm Jumeirah.