Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

Portland
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

110 m / 361 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

110 m / 361 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

87.2 m / 286 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

18
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
1 2 3 Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building Outline
Height 110.0 m / 361 ft
Floors 18
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

EGWW Federal Building

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed, 2013

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

United States

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Portland

Postal Code

97201

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel

Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

110.0 m / 361 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
110.0 m / 361 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
87.2 m / 286 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

18

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

184

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

7

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

48,774 m² / 524,999 ft²

Construction Schedule
2003

Proposed

2010

Construction Start

2013

Completed

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Owner
General Services Administration
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Cutler Anderson Architects
Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

SERA Architects
Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

KPFF Consulting Engineers
MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Interface Engineering; PAE Consulting Engineers; Stantec Ltd.
Contractor
Main Contractor

The main contractor is the supervisory contractor of all construction work on a project, management of sub-contractors and vendors, etc. May be referred to as "Construction Manager," however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Main Contractor" exclusively.

Howard S Wright Construction
Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Acoustic Design Studio; Charles M. Salter Associates
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Larson Engineering, Inc.
Landscape
PLACE
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Benson Industries, Inc.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

Videos

26 October 2015 | Portland

A Model Modernization: Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building and GSA’s Mid-Century Inventory

Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building (EGWW) is an 18-story federal office designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and constructed in downtown Portland, Oregon, in 1975....

Research

26 October 2015

A Model Modernization: Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building and GSA’s Mid-Century Inventory

Leslie Shepherd, General Services Administration

Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building (EGWW) is an 18-story federal office designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and constructed in downtown Portland, Oregon, in 1975....

About Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

The Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt (EGWW) Federal Building is an office tower, completed in 1974. The building no longer met the functional or the energy and conservation requirements of the contemporary US government, so a major renovation project was undertaken. A mechanical upgrade, seismic retrofit, and full interior rehabilitation was paired with a full replacement of the building envelope with a distinctive shading facade, affording better energy performance and a new lease on life.

While investigating the brief, the architects discovered that the existing concrete skin of the structure covered up to 600 millimeters of floor area for every 300 lineal millimeters of exterior wall. By applying a new skin to the existing slab edges and making other changes related to HVAC systems, the design added 9,449 square meters of new rentable office space, which amortized the added cost of the envelope. About 650 square meters of that space was freed up by switching to water cooling, which reduced the building’s thermal load to the point that the large fans for the previous forced-air cooling system could be removed. Additionally, removing the concrete façade panels simplified the seismic retrofit of the building due to the reduction of weight; the new façade system could be attached to the structural frame with a series of relatively short steel beams.

Because of the importance daylighting plays in human health and comfort, the project optimized solar penetration in the perimeter zone by deploying a low-powered ambient lighting in concert with focused task lamps. This resulted in a 50-to-60 percent reduction in energy consumption for lighting, while providing occupants with a valuable connection to the outdoors. The depth and spacing of the shading devices were varied to arrive at the performance metrics the designers used to derive the building’s aesthetic expression.

In order to respond to the unique solar exposure of the site, each face of the building was designed to both shade direct solar gain and reflect light into the interior spaces to enhance day-lighting. The result was a building that presents a different face to each solar circumstance. The reed-like shades affixed to the sides of the building are tuned for each facade to reduce solar gain, and a 3,962 square-meter roof canopy supports a 180 kW photovoltaic array, while also collecting rainwater.

Greater than 65 percent water savings will be achieved through a dual strategy of incorporating-water conserving plumbing fixtures together with a rainwater system. The water conservation strategy started with an analysis of how the existing building used water. Eighty-seven percent of the building’s water usage is for domestic uses, with 13 percent used for irrigation of surrounding vegetation. Because of this large interior use, the strategy focused on reusing rainwater for non-potable flush fixture uses first. Landscape water use is reduced by over 50 percent as well, through use of drought-resistant landscaping and incorporation of subsurface irrigation.

A 624,593-liter tank, created by repurposing an old rifle range, allows rainwater to be stored and used for toilet flushing, irrigation, and mechanical cooling tower makeup water. The tank also supports another project goal: mitigating the negative effects of urban runoff. Ultimately, the EGWW building is expected to save over 7.5 million liters of water annually – enough water to fill 22 swimming pools.

EGWW is designed to achieve a 60 percent reduction in energy use compared to the existing building, and a reduction of Energy Use Intensity (EUI) by 45 percent. A large portion of those savings will come from having eliminated forced-air fans.

These savings are the result of an integrated design process that prioritized comfort for the occupants and energy performance. Exterior shading, tuned by facade orientation, provides solar control while enhancing daylighting, thereby minimizing cooling load and peak electric load, and improving thermal comfort. These integrated strategies allowed the prime energy conservation measure, a radiant ceiling heating and cooling system, to be realized. Additionally, the building program was tuned to optimize performance with an ideal plan optimized at 70 percent open offices and 30 percent closed offices, provided for each agency. Common areas were moved toward windows, and interior walls were changed to glass to admit more light.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building Americas 2014 Winner

2014 CTBUH Awards

26 October 2015 | Portland

A Model Modernization: Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building and GSA’s Mid-Century Inventory

Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building (EGWW) is an 18-story federal office designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and constructed in downtown Portland, Oregon, in 1975....

06 November 2014 | Portland

2014 Awards - Session 3 Q&A

Thursday, 6th November 2014 Chicago, USA. Leslie Shepherd, Chief Architect, General Services Administration, James Cutler, Founding Partner, Cutler Anderson Architects, Michael Goldrick, Project Management Director,...

06 November 2014 | Portland

Best Tall Building Americas: Concrete Monolith to Green Machine: Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

The Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt (EGWW) Federal Building is an office tower, completed in 1974. The building no longer met the functional or the energy and...

06 November 2014 | Portland

CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Dinner

The 13th Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner was held in Mies van der Rohe's iconic Crown Hall, on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, Chicago....

06 November 2014 | Portland

Interview: Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building

Thursday 6th November 2014. Chicago, IL. Leslie Sheppard, General Services Administration, and Jim Cutler, Cutler Anderson Architects, are interviewed by Chris Bentley regarding the Best...