Tour Carpe Diem
Courbevoie
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

166 m / 545 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

166 m / 545 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

143 m / 469 ft
1 2 3 Tour Carpe Diem Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

35
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 166 m / 545 ft
Floors 35
Official Name

The current legal building name.

Tour Carpe Diem
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2013
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
92400
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
166 m / 545 ft
To Tip
166 m / 545 ft
Occupied
143 m / 469 ft
Observatory
143 m / 469 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

35
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
# of Parking Spaces

Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

355
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

13
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

44,016 m² / 473,784 ft²
Rankings
#
135
Tallest in Europe
#
12
Tallest in France
#
6
Tallest in Courbevoie
#
59
Tallest Office Building in Europe
#
12
Tallest Office Building in France
#
6
Tallest Office Building in Courbevoie
#
97
Tallest Concrete Building in Europe
#
10
Tallest Concrete Building in France
#
5
Tallest Concrete Building in Courbevoie
Construction Schedule
2007

Proposed

2011

Construction Start

2013

Completed

Owner
Aviva France; Credit Agricole
Developer
Gerald D Hines Interests; L’Établissement Public d’Aménagement de la Défense Seine Arche
Architect
SRA architectes
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
SNC Lavalin
Contractor
Besix; SBX; SPIE Batignolles

Acoustics

Lasa

Code

Socotec

Cost

GV Ingenierie

Environmental

Urbaconseil

Geotechnical

Cabinet Daniel Legrand

Interiors

Jean Jegou

Landscape

Mutabilis

Lighting

Philippe Almond

Sustainability

Atelier Ten; Cabinet Penicaud

Cladding

Concrete

Lafarge Beton

Formwork

Paint/Coating

AkzoNobel

Sealants

Steel

Riva

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Urban Habitat Award 2015 Award of Excellence

2015 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

Young Professionals Committee Holds Social Event at RAMSA


23 June 2015 - Event

Videos

18 October 2016 | Courbevoie

This presentation was intended to introduce the upcoming CTBUH technical guide titled "The Space Between," which investigates the importance of publicly accessible spaces surrounding tall...

Research

17 October 2016

James Parakh, City of Toronto Planning Division

This paper is intended to introduce the upcoming CTBUH technical guide titled “The Space Between,” which investigates the importance of publicly accessible spaces surrounding tall...

About Tour Carpe Diem

Tour Carpe Diem sets La Défense on a fresh path to pedestrian-friendly urbanism by reconnecting the raised esplanade that continues the axis of the Champs-Elysées to the surrounding urban fabric of the town of Courbevoie to the north. A monumental stair descends from the building's winter garden and lobby to a public plaza on the Boulevard Circulaire, where a second front welcomes visitors at what was heretofore the back of the site.

Tour Carpe Diem's pure form and faceted facades allow the tower to stand out in a thicket of tall buildings in La Défense. The building's sleek glass facades are stretched tautly over distinctive sculptural crystalline massing generated by careful consideration of climate and context. Sweeping window walls are oriented to the best views, and narrow facades are turned to the setting sun to minimize solar gain in the office interiors. In addition, Tour Carpe Diem is the first to exceed France’s Haute Qualité Environnementale standards and also to achieve LEED-CS Platinum certification.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Urban Habitat Award 2015 Award of Excellence

2015 CTBUH Awards

18 October 2016 | Courbevoie

This presentation was intended to introduce the upcoming CTBUH technical guide titled "The Space Between," which investigates the importance of publicly accessible spaces surrounding tall...

17 October 2016

James Parakh, City of Toronto Planning Division

This paper is intended to introduce the upcoming CTBUH technical guide titled “The Space Between,” which investigates the importance of publicly accessible spaces surrounding tall...

04 February 2016

Daniel Safarik, CTBUH

A growing number of tall buildings recognized by the CTBUH, through its international awards programs and research, are noteworthy not so much because of their...

11 June 2013

Viewpoints: The London Conference

European architecture is at a crossroads. Its commercial and environmental realities are driving buildings ever-higher, but not all are convinced. In this article – contributed...

23 June 2015

Young Professionals Committee Holds Social Event at RAMSA

The YPC held an event at the RAMSA office in New York City, where attendees had an opportunity to network, and learn more the exciting projects RAMSA is developing.