67
Global
Height rank
The Pinnacle
Guangzhou China
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

350.3 m / 1,149 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

350.3 m / 1,149 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

264.2 m / 867 ft
1 2 3 The Pinnacle Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

60
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6
Height 350.3 m / 1,149 ft
Floors 60
Official Name

The current legal building name.

The Pinnacle
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Guangsheng International Building, Grand International Mansion
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2012
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

concrete
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
350.3 m / 1,149 ft
To Tip
350.3 m / 1,149 ft
Occupied
264.2 m / 867 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

60
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

6
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

155,635 m² / 1,675,241 ft²
Rankings
#
67
Tallest in the World
#
39
Tallest in Asia
#
33
Tallest in China
#
4
Tallest in Guangzhou
#
24
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
14
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
11
Tallest Office Building in China
#
2
Tallest Office Building in Guangzhou
#
19
Tallest Concrete Building in the World
#
3
Tallest Concrete Building in Asia
#
2
Tallest Concrete Building in China
#
1
Tallest Concrete Building in Guangzhou
Construction Schedule
2007

Proposed

2008

Construction Start

2012

Completed

Owner/Developer
Guangdong Sheng Ming Real Estate Development Co., Ltd.
Architect
Guangzhou Hanhua Architects & Engineers
Structural Engineer
Guangzhou Hanhua Architects & Engineers
MEP Engineer
Guangzhou Hanhua Architects & Engineers
Guangzhou Municipal Construction Group JV

Sealants

Dow Corning Corporation

CTBUH Initiatives

Research

31 December 2012

Kevin Brass, Antony Wood & Marty Carver, CTBUH

For the first time in six years the number of tall buildings completed annually around the world declined as the effects of the global financial...

About The Pinnacle

The Pinnacle is located in the Zhujiang New Town development within greater Guangzhou, which is home to the city’s purpose-built central business district. The tower’s central location provides easy access to most of the surrounding city via bus and rail transit. Nearby green spaces offer a quick escape for the many employees working within the building’s various offices.

The Pinnacle stands out from its neighbors through its neo-classical design. A series of setbacks and granite-clad vertical stripes recall historic design elements like the flying buttress. Whereas most new buildings in China are clad in glass, this building uses a mixture of materials including granite and metal to add variety and depth to the exterior. Their combined effect results in a tower that not only appears neo-classical, but also hints at art-deco and neo-gothic influences. These western design elements are not only apparent on the outside, but are carried through to many interior details as well – as seen in the rational, yet tastefully decorated elevator lobby.

Despite being inspired by the styles of old, the building employs state-of-the-art design components. Insulated glass keeps ultraviolet light out, while calcium sulfate flooring material prevents fires and damps excessive noise and static electricity. Energy-efficient lighting is also installed throughout the tower. These various systems have earned the building a LEED Gold certification.

The tower rises to a literal pinnacle, as a spire caps the structure after it narrows through a series of setbacks. Its unique design sets it apart from nearby structures, including many of the towers both complete and under construction in the Pearl River Delta and China at large.

31 December 2012

Kevin Brass, Antony Wood & Marty Carver, CTBUH

For the first time in six years the number of tall buildings completed annually around the world declined as the effects of the global financial...

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

31 December 2012

For the first time in six years the number of tall buildings completed annually around the world declined as the effects of the global financial crisis became evident.

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