4 Times Square
New York City United States
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

340.7 m / 1,118 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

246.5 m / 809 ft
1 2 4 Times Square Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

48
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
Height 246.54 m / 809 ft
Floors 48
Official Name

The current legal building name.

4 Times Square
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Conde Nast Building
Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 1999
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
10036
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
246.54 m / 809 ft
To Tip
340.69 m / 1,118 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

48
Floors Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

2
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

32
Rankings
#
83
Tallest in North America
#
73
Tallest in United States
#
30
Tallest in New York City
#
229
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
45
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
41
Tallest Office Building in United States
#
15
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
43
Tallest Steel Building in the World
#
24
Tallest Steel Building in North America
#
23
Tallest Steel Building in United States
#
10
Tallest Steel Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
1995

Proposed

1996

Construction Start

1999

Completed

Architect
Structural Engineer

Fire Proofing

Grace Construction Products

Steel

Owen Steel Company Inc.

CTBUH Initiatives

Building Movement and Damping Workshop, Shanghai 2014


16 September 2014 - Event

Videos

26 October 2015 | New York City

Tall Buildings in urban landscapes present a unique challenge in the field of sustainable building. These structures tend to attract a tenant base of dynamic...

Research

26 October 2015

Alexander Durst, The Durst Organization

Tall Buildings in urban landscapes present a unique challenge in the field of sustainable building. These structures tend to attract a tenant base of dynamic...

About 4 Times Square

The design for 4 Times Square was started in 1995. The site is in Times Square and the building has 1,600,000 rentable square feet. Fox & Fowle agreed with The Durst Organization that the goal was to do the “best” possible building using the latest proven technology. The building used building incorporated photovoltaics (BIPV) and two 400 KW United Technologies fuel cells. Other innovations included fly ash in the concrete, sensing devices in the return air plenums to detect CO2 levels and VOC’s, a mechanical equipment room located at the top of the building to allow daylight for the building engineering team, natural gas powered chillers, a hat truss at the building top to reduce steel and concrete, variable speed drives (unique at the time) on fans, pumps and motors, 85% particulate filtering system on the fresh air, (upgraded to 95% in 2010) and bicycle racks, and a separate exhaust shaft going thru the entire building to allow for smoking rooms on every floor (at the time, NY City allowed smoking in buildings if proper ventilation was provided). This precluded the building being allowed to file for LEED as non-smoking was a prerequisite. The building was featured in an exhibit at the National Building Museum called “Big and Green” and was on the cover of the book created for the exhibit.

At the time of its completion in 1999 it was heralded as the greenest high rise building in the world. The initial tenants were Skadden Arps, and Conde Nast, for whom the building is named.

26 October 2015 | New York City

Tall Buildings in urban landscapes present a unique challenge in the field of sustainable building. These structures tend to attract a tenant base of dynamic...

06 November 2014 | New York City

Thursday, 6th November 2014 Chicago, USA. Helmut Jahn, CEO, JAHN, Tomohiko Yamanashi, Design Principal, Nikken Sekkei, Dakki Hui, Senior Property & Facility Manager, Kai Shing...

06 November 2014 | New York City

Douglas Durst is the chairman and a member of the third generation to lead The Durst Organization, one of New York’s oldest and most respected...

21 October 2010 | New York City

Prof. Seinuk is known as a worldwide authority on the design and construction of high-rise concrete and steel buildings. A reflection of his life's work...

03 March 2008 | New York City

Mir Ali and Paul Armstrong from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign discussed the critical design factors and strategies that warrant consideration to accomplish sustainable...

26 October 2015

Alexander Durst, The Durst Organization

Tall Buildings in urban landscapes present a unique challenge in the field of sustainable building. These structures tend to attract a tenant base of dynamic...

03 March 2008

Robert F. Fox, Jr., Cook + Fox Architects

Through four case studies – 4 Times Square, the Battery Park City Guidelines, The Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park, and PlaNYC2030 –...

10 October 2004

Sudhir Jambhekar, Fox & Fowle Architects

Times Square has seen the development of more than 15 new high-rises in the past two decades. The firm that has designed the most of...

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured 4 Times Square and Bank of America Tower which are a fantastic look at two generations of towers that focus on sustainability and quality of environment.

16 September 2014

Building Movement and Damping Workshop, Shanghai 2014

The Building Movement and Damping Technical Workshop reviewed some of the latest strategies and concepts for helping tall buildings avoid movement in seismic and wind events.