41
Global
Height rank
30 Hudson Yards
New York City United States
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

387.1 m / 1,270 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

387.1 m / 1,270 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

342.1 m / 1,123 ft
1 2 3 30 Hudson Yards Outline
Floors

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

73
Height 387.07 m / 1,270 ft
Floors 73
Official Name

The current legal building name.

30 Hudson Yards
Other Names

Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Hudson Yards Tower A, Manhattan Tower, Hudson Yards North Tower
Name of Complex

A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Type

CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building
Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished
Completed, 2019
Country

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

City

The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Postal Code
10001
Function

A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office
Structural Material

Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

steel
LEED Gold BD+C: Core and Shell
Official Website
Height

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

Architectural
387.07 m / 1,270 ft
To Tip
387.07 m / 1,270 ft
Occupied
342.14 m / 1,123 ft
Observatory
336.65 m / 1,104 ft
Floors Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

73
# of Elevators

Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

59
Tower GFA

Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

361,993 m² / 3,896,460 ft²
Rankings
#
41
Tallest in the World
#
7
Tallest in North America
#
7
Tallest in United States
#
5
Tallest in New York City
#
15
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
4
Tallest Office Building in North America
#
4
Tallest Office Building in United States
#
3
Tallest Office Building in New York City
#
2
Tallest Steel Building in the World
#
2
Tallest Steel Building in North America
#
2
Tallest Steel Building in United States
#
1
Tallest Steel Building in New York City
Construction Schedule
2011

Proposed

2014

Construction Start

2019

Completed

Owner
Hudson Yards; Oxford Properties Group Inc.; Related Companies
Developer
Oxford Properties Group Inc.; Related Companies
Architect
Structural Engineer
MEP Engineer
Tishman Construction

Civil

Philip Habib & Associates

Energy Concept

Vidaris, Inc.

Environmental

Schlaich Bergermann und Partner; Heintges & Associates

Façade Maintenance

Entek Engineering Ltd.

Geotechnical

Landscape

Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects

Observatory

CS Facades S.r.l.

Sustainability

Vidaris, Inc.

Wind

Aluminium

Formwork

Hardware

Empire Architectural Metal & Glass Corp.

Steel

ArcelorMittal; COREY; CAST CONNEX; Cimolai

CTBUH Initiatives

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2019


12 December 2019 - CTBUH Research

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers


22 August 2018 - CTBUH Research

See more

Videos

17 October 2016 | New York City

Monday October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Dennis Poon of Thornton Tomasetti, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 4c: Structural & Geotechnic Engineering. As the...

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Research

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

The combined brains of the CTBUH editorial and database staff boldly predict what might happen across the global skyscraper industry in 2020. Check out our...

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Global News

02 September 2020 | New York City

Edge, among the highest outdoor sky decks in the Western Hemisphere, announced that it reopened to the public on 2 September 2020 at Noon.  The...

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About 30 Hudson Yards

30 Hudson Yards will anchor the Hudson Yards development, touted as the largest private real estate development in United States history. Located on the west side of Manhattan, Hudson Yards is to become a new center for retail, commerce, and culture for the area. The whole development is intended to be an integrated “city within a city,” incorporating residential and office buildings, streets, parks, utilities, and commercial space into one complete whole. Built on top of an active rail yard, and located steps away from a recent subway extension, Hudson Yards will be thoroughly incorporated into the larger urban fabric.

As the largest planned building in the development, 30 Hudson Yards stands out not just for its size, but for how it relates to the nearby towers through a series of setbacks and ledges. Rising from a shared podium, 10 and 30 Hudson Yards have a mirrored relationship; they gently taper away from each other, creating a “v”-shaped negative space between them. This strong visual interaction is meant to anchor the dynamic architectural presence of the development.

Unlike most buildings in the complex, the tower will be devoted primarily to office space. It will feature column-free floor plans and floor-to-ceiling glass in order to maximize surrounding views, as well as a cantilevered observation deck that will be open to the public. Several sustainable design solutions will be present on site, including organic waste collection and on-site energy generation, resulting in an expected LEED Gold certification and a 30 percent increase in energy efficiency when compared to the average New York City building. As the mainstay of a development that seeks to redefine Manhattan’s west side, 30 Hudson Yards is poised to make a significant and enduring mark on The Big Apple.

17 October 2016 | New York City

Monday October 17, 2016. Shenzhen, China. Dennis Poon of Thornton Tomasetti, presents at the 2016 China Conference Session 4c: Structural & Geotechnic Engineering. As the...

18 September 2014 | New York City

September 18, 2014. Shanghai, China. James von Klemperer from Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC presents at the 2014 Shanghai Conference closing plenary on "Urban Density...

30 January 2020

CTBUH Research

The combined brains of the CTBUH editorial and database staff boldly predict what might happen across the global skyscraper industry in 2020. Check out our...

12 December 2019

CTBUH Research

The year 2019 was remarkable for the tall building industry, with 26 supertall buildings (300 meters or taller) completed, the most in any year. This...

28 July 2018

Aine Brazil, Thornton Tomasetti

Aine Brazil, Vice Chairman, Thornton Tomasetti, is the recipient of the 2018 CTBUH Fazlur R. Khan Medal. Through a 40-plus-year career, she has been responsible...

22 October 2015

Jay Cross, Hudson Yards

Hudson Yards is the largest private real estate development ever undertaken in the United States. The site, built over a working rail yard, will eventually...

22 October 2015

Marianne Kwok, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

Hudson Yards is a mixed-use development built over rail yards on the west side of New York’s Manhattan Island. As the largest real estate project...

22 October 2015

CTBUH Research

A timeline of skyscraper completions in New York uncannily resembles the boom and bust cycles of the United States in the 20th and early 21st...

02 September 2020 | New York City

Edge, among the highest outdoor sky decks in the Western Hemisphere, announced that it reopened to the public on 2 September 2020 at Noon.  The...

09 March 2020 | New York City

The opening of Edge, the highest outdoor sky deck in the Western Hemisphere, offering 360-degree views of New York City’s iconic skyline will be celebrated...

15 March 2019 | New York City

At noon on March 15, 2019, New York’s newest neighborhood ceremonially opened for business. Hudson Yards‘ first public-facing attractions, the Shops & Restaurants and Thomas...

22 August 2018

CTBUH Study Examines Tallest Buildings with Dampers

CTBUH has released a Tall Buildings in Numbers (TBIN) interactive data study on the world's tallest buildings with dampers.

27 July 2018

Talking Tall: Engineering a Better Future

In the 2018 CTBUH Journal Issue III, Aine Brazil, Vice Chairman, Thornton Tomasetti, talks about her career highlights in high-rises and the support for more women in engineering.

13 October 2016

The Council is pleased to announce the Top Company Rankings for numerous disciplines as derived from the list of projects appearing in 100 of the World’s Tallest Buildings.

3 May 2016

CTBUH Philadelphia: Creating Real Estate Out of Thin Air

The CTBUH Philadelphia Committee hosted speakers at the Hayworth Showroom in Philadelphia to discover how the development at 30th Street Station can be made a reality.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured City Point Complex, Barclays Center, and 461 Dean Street which have impacted the cityscape of Brooklyn.

28 October 2015

CTBUH 2015 delegates toured High Line, which have significantly changed the urban landscape of New York City, from its history to its near-future.